A Sports Novel in Verse: Beanball by Gene Fehler

Terrible things can happen in sports. Seasons, careers, and even lives can end in the blink of an eye.  Although Beanball covermany of us cheer on participants in both youth and adult sporting events, we all know that entertainment can turn to horror in a split second. This sort of unfortunate turn is what happens to a young baseball player in the verse-novel Beanball by Gene Fehler. At the center of the plot is Luke “Wizard” Wallace, a star player on his high school’s baseball team who is unable to remove himself from the path of an errant fastball. This awful occurrence and its effects on a community are the focus for the rest of the book.

The story is told from the perspectives of a large cast of characters, some who witness the event and others who know people who were involved. After reading the book, this seems like the only possible way for this story to be told as well as it is. Readers are able to get many different viewpoints on this  event and its aftermath. For example, the umpire from the game is the one who describes the terrible life-changing moment:

“I still see it all in slow motion,

hear the sounds:

The pitcher shouting

A crack, but not like when ball hits bat or helmet.

The sound of bone shattering.

Then silence. I know it lasts only for a split second,

but with Luke lying there, it seems more like an eternity

before screams come from everywhere.

Probably even from me,

but I don’t remember that.”

Others who offer their perspective include the devastated pitcher who threw the ball, Wallace’s girlfriend, teammates, teachers, and many others. Readers get real insight into the characters, especially when outward appearances are much different from the thoughts running through their heads.

Throughout the book, I enjoyed the sprinkling of fantastic figurative language that Fehler used, especially for the injured Wallace whose life has fallen apart and he is trying to make some sense of how to put together the pieces. While Wallace is in the hospital and he is not sure what will happen, many people come to visit him, though he does not generally show any appreciation for these visits; however, his feelings tell a different story:

“Sometimes I feel like I’m trapped on a desert island.

Once in awhile a ship comes in.

But not to save me.

Not to take me away.

A visitor shows up and then leaves.

The ship sails into the sunset,

and I’m alone again.”

Even though this is a book with a central focus around a sport, I would recommend this novel to readers who may not necessarily like sports books. Anyone who enjoys realistic fiction and who wants to see how characters deal with the trials they are faced with should pick up this book. Due to some repeated use of minor curses by an aggressive coach, as well as the terrible event at the center of the plot, Beanball is probably most appropriate for middle-grade readers.

Check out Beanball by Gene Fehler today!

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