A Poetry Collection from Donald Graves

Baseball, Snakes, and Summer Squash   As I’ve continued to branch out my reading into the world of poetry, I picked up a book called Baseball, Snakes, and Summer Squash by Donald Graves, an author who is best known for his work with improving writing instruction in schools. This collection of poems written about Graves’s childhood has a nice variety of topics, which will allow children and adults alike to find a few to which they can relate. The subjects in the poems range from struggling with math to interacting with family members to getting into some childhood mischief. One of my favorites is “The Firemen”, a poem in which Graves writes about how the desire of boys to pretend to be firefighters leads to the accidental starting of a wildfire that is barely  contained. I really enjoyed the imagery in this poem, like when the fire starts to get out of control:

“but a gust of wind

whips real red fire

past our buckets,

and the dry grass snaps

us awake, flowing now

like an angry yellow wave

toward an open field.”

I feel like this collection will especially speak to boys, as they will most easily be able to put themselves in the writers’ shoes and visualize the poems with themselves as the narrator. Poems that especially stand out in this regard involve struggling with handwriting, playing baseball in an open field, and talking about a crush on a classmate with a group of boys at recess, each boy declaring his love in turn.

Many of the poems in the collection bring happy and light visuals to mind, even though the reader knows from the start that life wasn’t necessarily easy for Donald and his family. In the poem “First Baseball Glove,” the reader finds out that the first mitt Graves ever owned was purchased with the family’s food money. Graves also has poems where he deals with bullying, struggles with learning to ride a bike, or loses the family dog in a car accident.

The poems in Baseball, Snakes, and Summer Squash are of the variety which will not elicit a “What did that mean?” response from children due to the down-to-earth nature of the topics and writing. If you are looking for a book of poetry to use with a child who has struggled with poems or is disinterested, this collection might be a good place to start.

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